Blogging History: Arizona teen exorcists; Philadelphia Free Library is …

One year
Teen exorcists from Arizona take on the UK and Harry Potter: Brynne Larson and Tess and Savannah Scherkenback, teenage girls from Arizona who happen to be exorcists just like Brynne’s dad, visit the UK! I bet they were a huge hit there. After all, Harry Potter author JK Rowling is British and, as Tess Scherkenback says, “The spells and things that you’re reading in the Harry Potter books, those aren’t just something that are made up, those are actual spells. Those are things that came from witchcraft books.”

Five years
Philadelphia Free Library System is shutting down: The Philadelphia Free Library system is broke, and they’re shutting it down, including cancelling “all branch and regional library programs, programs for children and teens, after school programs, computer classes, and programs for adults” and “all children programs, programs to support small businesses and job seekers, computer classes and after school programs” and “all library visits to schools, day care centers, senior centers and other community centers” and “all community meetings” and “all GED, ABE and ESL program.”

Article source: http://boingboing.net/2014/09/13/blogging-history-arizona-teen.html

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Are you a child of the ’60s, ’70s, ’80s or ’90s? Your computer use history has …

It’s always nice to take the occasional stroll down memory lane, reminiscing over past experiences and the things you used to like or grew up with.

Our first computers, or game consoles, are usually something of an important milestone in our lives as we discover the possibilities they offer. I had my first computer at the very start of the 1980s, and even to this day I share a slight bond with other users of the same system, due to that shared experience.

When you grew up, where you lived, and when you first got into computers, will define the system you first used and it might be the same as your peers, or something entirely different.

WhoIsHostingThis.com has put together an infographic that will tell you if you’re a child of the ’60s, ’70s, ’80s, ’90s, or ’00s, based on your computer history. It’s a broad brush picture, naturally, but it offers a fun look back in time, with mentions of CompuServe, Apple II, and, er, Teddy Ruxpin.

What decade were you a child of?

Article source: http://betanews.com/2014/09/13/are-you-a-child-of-the-60s-70s-80s-or-90s-your-computer-use-history-has-the-answers/

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Broadcom Foundation, Computer History Museum to support US STEM education

California-based communications chip maker Broadcom Corp´s (NASDAQ: BRCM) Broadcom Foundation non-profit and the Computer History Museum have announced a partnership to introduce underserved middle school students to coding and applied math through an innovative new community outreach initiative called Broadcom PresentsDesign_Code_Build.

Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a series of interactive STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) events at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View designed to introduce more than 400 Bay Area middle school students to the basic concepts involved in coding, such as logic, structure, space and change.

Through activities that emphasise problem solving, teamwork and project-based learning, students will gain hands-on experience by programming a Raspberry Pi, which uses a Broadcom BCM2835 system-on-a chip, navigating a maze using logic and investigating historical technologies to learn how computers were programmed in the past.

Each event is keynoted by a high-tech “Rock Star,” an industry luminary who will share his or her personal story to inspire students to learn the math and coding skills they need to hold 21st century jobs in computer-driven STEM fields such as technology, engineering, medicine, finance and design.

Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build will partner with major corporations in Silicon Valley and leading organizations such as Engineers For Tomorrow, Raspberry Pi Foundation, Society for Women Engineers, and Broadcom´s own Women´s Network and Multicultural Network.

Collaborating community partners include organizations such as Aim High and SMASH Prep/Level Playing Field Institute, which provide services to middle school minority students.

Find out more at www.broadcom.com.

Article source: http://www.financial-news.co.uk/23977/2014/09/broadcom-foundation-computer-history-museum-to-support/

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Who is the best defensive tackle in OSU history? Voting ends Friday

Posted: Thursday, September 11, 2014 12:00 am
|


Updated: 2:35 pm, Thu Sep 11, 2014.

Who is the best defensive tackle in OSU history? Voting ends Friday

By Staff Reports

TulsaWorld.com

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1 comment

This fall, you get the chance to crown the kings of Oklahoma State football.

Each Monday, we’ll announce five candidates for the best defensive player in Cowboys history. You have until 1 p.m. Friday to vote for your favorites. Each Sunday, we’ll announce the winners, culminating Nov. 23 when we unveil your selection for the best OSU defensive player of all time.

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Thursday, September 11, 2014 12:00 am.

Updated: 2:35 pm.

Article source: http://www.tulsaworld.com/sportsextra/osu/who-is-the-best-defensive-tackle-in-osu-history-voting/article_e9a5b238-61f0-58fc-ae34-23cbb7078f2b.html

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Oculus VR founder to give largest donation in university history

Through the largest gift in this university’s history, former university student and virtual-reality pioneer Brendan Iribe is donating $31 million toward building a new, cutting-edge computer science building and creating a scholarship for the department. 

The majority of Iribe’s gift, about $30 million, will go toward the construction of the Brendan Iribe Center for Computer Science and Innovation, which is expected to cost about $140 million and will be located in what is currently a parking lot at the corner of Campus Drive and Paint Branch Drive, university President Wallace Loh said. 

The remaining $1 million from the gift will create the Brendan Iribe Scholarship in Computer Science.

Iribe, who attended the university for one semester during his freshman year in 1999, is the CEO and co-founder of Oculus VR, a virtual-reality startup Facebook announced in March that it had reached an agreement to acquire the company for $2 billion. Oculus VR’s virtual-reality product is an immersive science in which a person is transported to another world with a full 3-D view of the surroundings by putting on a headset.

Iribe said he’s eager to see university students creating the future of virtual reality and hopes that the new center will inspire them to get involved.

“If you look up and the name on the building is someone that’s actually out there pioneering the future right now and isn’t somebody you have to read a history book on, I think it’ll make a big difference,” he said. 

University alumnus Michael Antonov, a 2003 university alumnus and Oculus’ chief software architect, is also donating $4 million, $3.5 million of which will go toward the computer science building construction. The rest will go toward scholarships, Iribe said. 

Iribe’s mother, Elizabeth Iribe, will establish two endowed chairs in the computer science department through a $3 million gift. 

The new facility will house resources for computer science majors, as well as majors across disciplines, by expanding classroom capacity, designing state-of-the-art labs for robotics and virtual reality and creating “maker/hacker” spaces to encourage innovation, said Samir Khuller, computer science department chairman.

“[This building] will allow students to get together, to exchange ideas, to create change, to have a wonderful time while doing it, and some of these creations will actually mold innovation and entrepreneurship and very likely become a powerful engine for the economy [and] for the state,” said Jayanth Banavar, the computer, mathematical and natural sciences college dean. “So this new building, through Maryland, will actually transform society.”

Iribe said he envisions using the building to usher in a hub of technology and innovation on the East Coast, similar to how Silicon Valley functions in the West. 

“We’re using Silicon Valley as inspiration for the space and building and making it feel like this really current generation engineering facility,” he said. “We should be able to run Oculus inside the Iribe center. This building should be able to accommodate everything Oculus would need.”

Sophomore computer science major Christian Johnson said he is excited to see a university alumnus giving back to the community through computer science research education support at this university.

“With Oculus VR, we are looking at a tremendous step in vision research and three-dimensional image processing and a lot of things that have been a culmination of research across academic institutions on campus,” Johnson said.

Aside from the physical presence of the new facility on the campus, this university community will reap benefits of having Oculus VR’s virtual-reality technology at its fingertips, Loh said. 

“This is a truly transformative gift,” Loh said. “It will make this university not just an even greater research university, but it will also make it into an even greater innovation university.”

Ties to the university

Iribe and Antonov both lived in Denton Hall their freshman year. Antonov’s roommate was Andrew Reisse, another Oculus founder who was killed in a hit-and-run last year. Iribe said Reisse will be the namesake of the new building’s mentoring center. 

While on a golf cart tour of the campus last year, Iribe said he noticed the current computer science building looked depressing and not indicative of the exciting changes in the field. So, in a spur-of-the-moment move, he said he announced to Banavar that he wanted to build a new building, with no knowledge of just how much that would cost. 

“Sure enough, the budget did end up a lot higher than I originally thought, but those are the types of things that happen on-campus,” Iribe said. “You embark on something, you make a bold, fast decision about something you don’t really know about, and you take the risk and you figure out how to make it work.”

An Innovative Facility 

The building Iribe has in mind is nothing like the drab, over-crowded structure that currently exists, he said. The new building will be all about collaboration and open spaces, featuring maker/hacker spaces where students can use resources such as 3-D printers to work on their own projects. 

“Right now, we are bursting at the seams in terms of classroom space, and we literally have no space for students to interact with each other,” Khuller said. “We have limited space for students to meet with teaching assistants for office hours.”

Iribe said he hopes this state-of-the-art facility inspires the next generation of computer scientists.

“If I was still in high school in Maryland and I got a chance to attend a high school computer event or competition at the Iribe Center, I would hope that it completely inspired and blew me away and attracted me to want to come and  be a part of it,” he said. “We’re trying to put ourselves in the students’ shoes: How would we design this to really attract the brightest minds in the world to want to come to the University of Maryland and create the future?”

Article source: http://www.diamondbackonline.com/news/article_6ccaa084-3a15-11e4-aa75-001a4bcf6878.html

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Broadcom Foundation and Computer History Museum Introduce …

HEADLINE2New Partnership Teaches Bay Area Students the Basics of Applied Math and Coding to Support Future Careers in STEM

IRVINE, Calif. and MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif., Sept. 10, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Broadcom Foundation, a non-profit organization funded by Broadcom Corporation

BRCM, +0.22%

and the Computer History Museum today announced a partnership to introduce underserved middle school students to coding and applied math through an innovative new community outreach initiative called Broadcom PresentsDesign_Code_Build. For more news, visit Broadcom Foundation's Newsroom or join the conversation on the Broadcom and Computer History Museum Facebook pages. 

Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build is a series of interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) events at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View designed to introduce more than 400 Bay Area middle school students to the basic concepts involved in coding, such as logic, structure, space and change. Through activities that emphasize problem solving, teamwork and project-based learning, students will gain hands-on experience by programming a Raspberry Pi, which uses a Broadcom® BCM2835 system-on-a chip (SoC), navigating a maze using logic and investigating historical technologies to learn how computers were programmed in the past.

Each event is keynoted by a high-tech "Rock Star," an industry luminary who will share his or her personal story to inspire students to learn the math and coding skills they need to hold 21st century jobs in computer-driven STEM fields such as technology, engineering, medicine, finance and design.  Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build will partner with major corporations in Silicon Valley and leading organizations such as Engineers For Tomorrow (E4T), Raspberry Pi Foundation, Society for Women Engineers (SWE), and Broadcom's own Women's Network and Multicultural Network. Collaborating community partners include organizations such as Aim High and SMASH Prep/Level Playing Field Institute, which provide services to middle school minority students.

"We are extremely excited to launch Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build with the Computer History Museum. The program will introduce the untapped talent reserve of young people to computer coding and afford them the opportunity to interact with volunteers working in exciting careers that rely on coding —from chip design to app building in fields from medicine to digital animation," said Paula Golden, Executive Director, Broadcom Foundation, and Director, Community Affairs, Broadcom Corporation. "Through our partnership, students will learn that analytical thinking and problem solving are important skills that future employers in virtually any profession are looking for and that there are great careers ahead for those who learn to code."

"Broadcom PresentsDesign_Code_Build is an innovative new outreach program that brings the power of coding to hundreds of Bay Area students, many of whom have never had access to the world of technology in a meaningful way before," said John Hollar, Computer History Museum Chief Executive Officer and President. "Through our partnership with the Broadcom Foundation, we look forward to creating a unique educational experience for these young people by providing access to technology and industry leaders and leveraging rich historical content through the Museum's legendary exhibits."

Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build hosts its first session on October 11, 2014. The 2014 schedule will include three full-day workshops in 2014, followed by four more in 2015.

For more information, visit the Broadcom Foundation and Computer History Museum websites or visit Broadcom Foundation's Newsroom and read the B-Inspired Blog. And to stay connected, visit the Broadcom and Computer History Museum Facebook pages.

About the Computer History Museum

The Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California, is a nonprofit organization with a four-decade history as the world's leading institution exploring the history of computing and its ongoing impact on society. The Museum is dedicated to the preservation and celebration of computer history, and is home to the largest international collection of computing artifacts in the world, encompassing computer hardware, software, documentation, ephemera, photographs, and moving images.

The Museum brings computer history to life through large-scale exhibits, an acclaimed speaker series, a dynamic website, docent-led tours, and an award-winning education program. The Museum's signature exhibition is "Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing," described by USA Today as "the Valley's answer to the Smithsonian." Other current exhibits include "Charles Babbage's Difference Engine No. 2," IBM 1401 and PDP-1 Demo Labs.

For more information and updates, call (650) 810-1059, visit www.computerhistory.org, check us out on Facebook, and follow @computerhistory on Twitter

About Broadcom Foundation

Broadcom Foundation was founded to inspire and enable young people throughout the world to enter careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) through partnerships with local schools, colleges, universities and non-profit organizations. Broadcom Foundation is the proud sponsor of the Broadcom MASTERS®, a program of Society for Science the Public – a premier science and engineering competition for middle school children. The Foundation's mission is to advance education in STEM by funding research, recognizing scholarship and increasing opportunity. Learn more at www.broadcomfoundation.org

About Broadcom

Broadcom Corporation

BRCM, +0.22%

a FORTUNE 500® company, is a global leader and innovator in semiconductor solutions for wired and wireless communications. Broadcom® products seamlessly deliver voice, video, data and multimedia connectivity in the home, office and mobile environments.  With the industry's broadest portfolio of state-of-the-art system-on-a-chip, Broadcom is changing the world by Connecting everything®. For more information, go to www.broadcom.com.

Broadcom®, the pulse logo, Connecting everything®, the Connecting everything logo and Broadcom MASTERS® are among the trademarks of Broadcom Corporation and/or its affiliates in the United States, certain other countries and/or the EU. Any other trademarks or trade names mentioned are the property of their respective owners

 

SOURCE Broadcom Corporation; BRCM Broadcom Foundation

Copyright (C) 2014 PR Newswire. All rights reserved

Article source: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/broadcom-foundation-and-computer-history-museum-introduce-designcodebuild-program-for-middle-school-stem-education-2014-09-10

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Apple Watch: We Are Now Literally Handcuffed To Our Computers

Apple CEO Tim Cook announces the Apple Watch during an Apple special event at the Flint Center for the Performing Arts on September 9, 2014 in Cupertino, California.
Justin Sullivan—Getty Images

Apple’s watch could be as revolutionary as the first clocks

Article source: http://time.com/3313069/apple-watch-iwatch-clocks-tech/

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Apple Unveils Watch Wearable Computer

After months of frenzied speculation, CEO Tim Cook on Tuesday introduced what Apple hopes will be the next must-have device: a wearable computer called the Apple Watch.

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History of the Computer (Infographic)

The majority of us use some form of computer on a daily basis, whether this is a laptop, desktop PC or tablet PC and the idea of not being able to use one is quite alien. However, it is only over the past two decades that computers have become popular in the home.

The term was first coined in 1613 and initially described people who carried out calculations, which has obviously changed somewhat to what we associate with the modern day computer that we all use now, but it wasn’t until 1822 that the first automatic computing engine was developed.

By and large computers in the 1800s and early 1900s were used for work and business purposes only, with IBM not introducing the first personal computer until 1981 and the first desktop computer being introduced in 1968.

By the late 1980s home computers were becoming increasingly popular but packaged software wasn’t always available so people had to learn computer programming (thank goodness we don’t have to do that now), and the majority of the components and peripherals were sold separately instead of as a package and they were very different to those that were used in the workplace.

Nowadays the majority of homes have at least one computer, or at least one tablet PC, and we’re able to download, install and update any software that we need to. Also, generally speaking the computers that we use at work are fundamentally the same as what we would personally use.

Related Resources from B2C
» Free Webcast: Build Better Products by Identifying and Validating Your Riskiest Assumptions

Ebuyer.com, the online electrical retailer, has produced an infographic on the History of the Computer. Read on to find out more.

This article is an original contribution by Aaron Dicks.

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Article source: http://www.business2community.com/infographics/history-computer-infographic-0998385

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Vikings-Rams Stats

Posted: Sunday, September 7, 2014 3:10 pm
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Updated: 6:23 pm, Sun Sep 7, 2014.

Vikings-Rams Stats

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First Quarter

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      Sunday, September 7, 2014 3:10 pm.

      Updated: 6:23 pm.

      Article source: http://www.maryvilledailyforum.com/news/state_news/article_97b14204-26a8-58b3-b6cc-76a654b48db4.html

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