The World’s Oldest Computer Operating Systems: Shift Ranking of July 28

Lenovo buys part of IBM’s server business
23.01.2014

The world’s largest PC maker, Lenovo of China, has agreed to buy IBM’s low-end server business in what appears to be a win-win deal. It’s the biggest ever tech acquisition by a Chinese company overseas.

Article source: http://www.dw.de/the-worlds-oldest-computer-operating-systems-shift-ranking-of-july-28/a-17816361

Spirit AeroSystem’s short and wild history

Spirit AeroSystems aerial

Aerial of the Spirit AeroSystems plant with the American Airlines maintenance facility in the background at Tulsa International airport on June 12, 2012. TOM GILBERT/Tulsa World

Aerial

Aerial of the Spirit Aerosystems plant with the American Airlines maintenance facility in the background at Tulsa International airport on June 12, 2012. TOM GILBERT/Tulsa World

Spirit AeroSystems in Tulsa Map



Spirit AeroSystem’s short Tulsa history

May 2003: Boeing announces sale of Wichita division, including Tulsa

June 2005: Boeing sells plants to Onex Corp., company renamed Spirit AeroSystems

Aug. 2013: Spirit AeroSystems puts Tulsa and McAlester facilities up for sale

Spirit’s potential suitors

Company: GKN

Headquarters: Redditch, United Kingdom

What they do: Automotive and aerospace manufacturing

Why they might like Tulsa: GKN and its GKN Aerospace subsidiary has been aggressively expanding into the aerospace industry in the last decade, acquiring aviation manufacturers in Kansas and New York and opening a facility in Alabama near Airbus’ Mobile factory. It has 18 facilities in the United States and the Gulfstream work done at the Oklahoma plants would be a major production increase.

Company: Triumph Group

Headquarters: Berwyn, Pennsylvania

What they do: aerospace component designer and manufacturer

Why they might like Tulsa: Triumph is one of the largest first-tier suppliers to airplane makers like Boeing, Airbus and Gulfstream in the United States and a major competitor to Spirit AeroSystems. Triumph is also a major player as a defense contract manufacturer, a realm Spirit executives have been pushing hard into.

Posted: Sunday, July 27, 2014 12:00 am
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Updated: 2:31 am, Sun Jul 27, 2014.

Spirit AeroSystem’s short and wild history

By KYLE ARNOLD
World Business Writer

TulsaWorld.com

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2 comments

In the year since Spirit AeroSystems put its Tulsa and McAlester facilities on the sales block, a new rumor about the imminent sale has surfaced almost every week.

It’s the nature of a sales process that has dragged on longer than company executives have expected. The original prediction was being close to a sale at the beginning of 2013.

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Sunday, July 27, 2014 12:00 am.

Updated: 2:31 am.

Article source: http://www.tulsaworld.com/business/aerospace/spirit-aerosystem-s-short-and-wild-history/article_182168fe-cd8c-55ab-a24e-19cc9b25e1f1.html

Nodaway County author publishes book on Arkoe’s history

Posted: Sunday, July 27, 2014 3:30 pm

Nodaway County author publishes book on Arkoe’s history

By JASON LAWRENCE
Assistant news editor

maryvilledailyforum.com

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In 1869, the Missouri Valley Railroad entered southern Nodaway County, determined to fulfill its contract with the State of Missouri to connect to a rail line coming south from Creston, Iowa. The rail lines were to meet in Hopkins, and thus establish a more direct route between Kansas City and Chicago. Along the path the railroad took, towns were platted. Among those founded was Arkoe, located nine miles southeast of Maryville, along the One Hundred and Two River.

That’s where Susan Cronk’s latest novel, “Where in the World is Arkoe Missouri?” picks up.

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Sunday, July 27, 2014 3:30 pm.


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Article source: http://www.maryvilledailyforum.com/news/article_0450838c-15af-11e4-a372-001a4bcf887a.html

13 computers that changed the world

 1 of 14
Gallery

Posted on 25 Jul 2014 at 15:41

Codebreaking computer Colossus is 70 this year – we look at the landmark models that followed that British innovation, from the Magnavox Odyssey to the IBM PC and beyond

This year marks the 70th birthday of Colossus, one of the most important machines in the history of IT. As well as being the world’s first “electronic” computer, it also played a pivotal role in helping to end World War II by deciphering coded German military messages.

Colossus has achieved something of a cult status among computer nerds and historians alike, but could you name the world’s first laptop, tablet or games console? Or even the world’s first web server or the first computer with a mouse-driven graphical user interface?

Davey Winder, PC Pro’s contributing editor and collector of vintage computers, uncovers the 13 most important pieces of computing hardware in history.

1944: Colossus

Although Charles Babbage had envisaged a programmable computer 100 years earlier, it was in 1944 that the first fully programmable and electronic digital computer was realised in the shape of the aptly named Colossus.

Using vacuum tubes to perform Boolean operations, and requiring the physical manipulation of telephone jack plugs, cords and switches
to change wiring in order to program it for new tasks, Colossus was designed by Tommy Flowers and influenced by Alan Turing’s crypto-analysis probability theories.

In all, there were ten Colossus computers built, each occupying a large room and consisting of eight racks more than 2.3m in height, arranged in two bays that were 5.5m in length. A fully functional replica was completed in 2007 and can now be seen at The National Museum of Computing at Bletchley Park.

1972: Magnavox Odyssey

Think video-gaming consoles and the names that spring to mind include Atari, Nintendo, Sega, Sony and Microsoft. However, none of these were responsible for kick-starting the home video-gaming revolution; that milestone belongs to the Magnavox Odyssey.

Developed by Ralph Baer – who later designed the Simon game – and released in 1972 (pre-dating Atari consoles by a few years), the Odyssey sold over 300,000 units before it was discontinued in 1975.

Designed for use with a TV, the games took the form of cartridges and required a plastic overlay to be taped to the screen. Tennis, football, hockey and roulette were all played by manipulating light using rudimentary controllers.

A shooting gallery game introduced the world’s first gun controller in the form of a full-sized, pump-action shotgun, which detected light as a target.

It may sound basic when compared with today’s consoles, but Atari was found guilty of patent infringement when it released its Pong game because it so closely resembled the Odyssey tennis game. Without the Odyssey, we wouldn’t see the likes of the Call of Duty or Grand Theft Auto franchises today.

1973: Xerox Alto

Most computer historians agree that the Xerox Alto was the first to combine a desktop graphical user interface (GUI) and Douglas Engelbart’s mouse input device in a meaningful way. Developed at Xerox PARC, the Alto was never commercially released, although thousands were built for use within Xerox facilities and by universities.

It included a monochrome bit-mapped VDU, and came with a three-button mouse, a visual UI and 2.5MB of removable data storage.

The Alto pushed the GUI input concept into the output too, being the first to enable true wysiwyg printing, and was designed to work with the laser printers Xerox was developing at the time.

The Alto changed the way users interacted with the computer and influenced the design of personal computing hardware, such as the Apple Macintosh, that followed.

1975: MITS Altair 8800

The Altair 8800 makes it onto our list on two counts: it was one of the first affordable home computer kits to hit the market; and it inspired future computing engineers and designers who went on to change the face
of computing as we know it.

Costing less than $400 (£250) at the time, the Altair was offered as a kit based on an eight-bit Intel 8080 CPU and a 256-byte memory. The display was nothing more than front-panel LEDs, and there was no keyboard either; input was via a collection of toggle switches.

However, the open 100-line computer bus went on to become the de facto standard S-100 bus, and the first programming language written for the device, Altair BASIC, was created by none other than Paul Allen and Bill Gates, who shortly went on to form Microsoft.

Article source: http://www.pcpro.co.uk/features/389986/13-computers-that-changed-the-world

Child porn website history found on East Bay teacher’s computer, defense says …

MARTINEZ — A forensic computer analysis found child porn website history and suspicious searches on two desktop computers belonging to former Woodside Elementary School teacher Joseph Martin, a police electronic data expert testified Thursday in week four of the instructor’s molestation trial.

Martin’s defense attorney argued that websites such as Milkboys and Gayboystube could have reached Martin’s computer through pop-ups and redirect websites that could send users to unintended pages.

Martin has pleaded not guilty to 150 counts of molestation involving 14 male former students. His attorney Patrick Clancy has argued that Martin was the victim of mass hysteria by students, parents and teachers.

In addition to the websites, Martin’s computers showed image searches for such phrases as “boys swim” and “boys experimenting” conducted with the porn filter turned off on the Google search, the expert said. After being placed on administrative leave in 2013 but before his arrest, Martin used his home computer to search phrases such as: “What do they do with child molesters in prison?” and “Can police look at my internet history?” according to the forensic report.

Clancy highlighted other searches that asked about teachers being “falsely accused” and “child sex abuse defined.”

Clancy also questioned lead Concord detective Tamra Roberts’ training on conducting child sex abuse cases with high numbers of alleged victims, citing a penal code that requires specific training within six months. Roberts’ supervisor testified that such training is hard to get in a short period of time and an investigator can still conduct probes while they wait to get the course.

Mount Diablo school district personnel chief Julie Braun Martin took the stand and was asked about the mystery 2002 letter written from a principal to Martin.

“If it did exist, it’s a mystery as to why it’s not in the personnel file,” she said.

Letters of reprimand, according to union contract language, must remain permanently in a teacher’s file, however they can be kept in a sealed file after four years. Martin had no sealed file. Clancy argued that contract language allows for non-disciplinary letters to be destroyed after two years.

Previous testimony described Martin as being “insistent” that the letter be destroyed, including a letter where Martin said he had an agreement with the letter’s author, his former principal, to purge it.

Finally, three male, former students and a parent testified they never saw any inappropriate touching and raved about Martin as a teacher.

The trial will continue Wednesday.

Contact Matthias Gafni at 925-952-5026. Follow him at Twitter.com/mgafni.

Article source: http://www.mercurynews.com/my-town/ci_26211820/child-porn-website-history-found-joseph-martins-computer

History’s worst computer viruses visualised as art


LSD

LSD is a DOS virus that displays a druggy video effect

Clay Hickson

  • “Computer viruses. We hate ‘em. Nevertheless, we remain
    fascinated by their evil plots. This fascination led to a new kind
    of art collection,” explains Bas van de Poel in the Computer Virus
    Catalog “About” section.

    The Computer Virus Catalog is a website displaying a range of
    artworks, each of which is based on or inspired by a famous
    computer-invading worm. It describes itself as an “illustrated
    guide to the worst computer viruses in history”. Every virus from
    Stuxnet — supposedly designed by the US and Israeli
    governments to attack Iranian nuclear facilities — to ILOVEYOU, which
    broke out in May 2000 and caused $10 billion in damages, is
    represented in the collection, and each has been illustrated by a
    different artist.

    “I approached artists whose work I really appreciate and have
    been following for a while. During the curation process I tried to
    create a nice mix of designers, illustrators and artists,” van de
    Poel explains to Wired.co.uk.

    It’s true that while viruses are notoriously and universally
    destructive, each has its own method and therefore its own story,
    and the damage to computers often also has a visual element to it
    as well. The Computer Virus Catalog is a thought-provoking
    collection that gets us to visualise each worm out of context and
    according to its nature, rather than generalising viruses as just
    one kind of evil.

    You can view
    the whole Computer Virus Catalog collection here.

    Article source: http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2014-07/23/the-computer-virus-catalog

  • 11 Trippy Illustrations of History’s Most Infamous Computer Viruses

    Nople virus by Merijn Hos depicts the Windows NT worm that spreads over local and shared network drives. When activated, the worm runs an animation that looks like a mass of fuzzy looking multi-colored strings and displays a note that’s translated to: “It’s time to format your disk.” Merijn Hos

    Merijn Hos

    This illustration of Stuxnet is by Mel Nguyen. The virus, created jointly by the U.S. and Israel, destroyed Iran’s nuclear centrifuges. Mel Nguyen

    Mel Nguyen

    The Melissa virus, as illustrated by Saiman Chow. This virus was named after its maker’s favorite stripper, hence the female motif. Saiman Chow.

    Saiman Chow.

    The Lichen virus by Jonathan Zawada depicts a sierpinski pyramid made of stones, covered in a glowing lichen which increases in frequency as the stones get smaller. The virus infects your computer’s .com and .exe files and activates a month later. Whenever there’s no keyboard activity for more than one minute, it produces lichen visualizations. Jonathan Zawada

    Jonathan Zawada

    Clay Hickson illustrated the LSD virus, which overwrites the files in your current directory and displays a rainbow animation across your screen. Clay Hickson

    Clay Hickson

    Illustrators Joost and Nick depicted the techno virus, which infects your computer and pumps out loud techno music while displaying the word TECHNO across your screen. Their version is a little more subtle. Joost and Nick

    Joost and Nick

    The Selectronic DOS virus embeds itself in your computer’s memory and is activated on Friday the 13th. “Countdown to Extinction” displays on your screen then you see an 8-bit grim reaper marching across it. Mike Perry imagine what this virus might look like from inside the computer. Mike Perry

    Mike Perry

    Jay Wright illustrated the Madman virus, which is a DOS virus that infects .exe files. Whenever you hit CTRL-ALT-DEL the virus displays an ASCII picture of an red-faced man. Jay Wright

    Jay Wright

    Hort illustrated the Marburg virus, which infects .EXE and .SCR files and pops up the critical error sign. Hort

    Hort

    Darius Ou Dahao’s version of the ILOVEYOU email virus, which broke out in 2000 and spread to more than 50 million computers. Darius Ou Dahao

    Darius Ou Dahao

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    Augmented Retaility

    Nople virus by Merijn Hos depicts the Windows NT worm that spreads over local and shared network drives. When activated, the worm runs an animation that looks like a mass of fuzzy looking multi-colored strings and displays a note that’s translated to: “It’s time to format your disk.” Merijn Hos

    Merijn Hos

    This illustration of Stuxnet is by Mel Nguyen. The virus, created jointly by the U.S. and Israel, destroyed Iran’s nuclear centrifuges. Mel Nguyen

    Mel Nguyen

    The Melissa virus, as illustrated by Saiman Chow. This virus was named after its maker’s favorite stripper, hence the female motif. Saiman Chow.

    Saiman Chow.

    The Lichen virus by Jonathan Zawada depicts a sierpinski pyramid made of stones, covered in a glowing lichen which increases in frequency as the stones get smaller. The virus infects your computer’s .com and .exe files and activates a month later. Whenever there’s no keyboard activity for more than one minute, it produces lichen visualizations. Jonathan Zawada

    Jonathan Zawada

    Clay Hickson illustrated the LSD virus, which overwrites the files in your current directory and displays a rainbow animation across your screen. Clay Hickson

    Clay Hickson

    Illustrators Joost and Nick depicted the techno virus, which infects your computer and pumps out loud techno music while displaying the word TECHNO across your screen. Their version is a little more subtle. Joost and Nick

    Joost and Nick

    The Selectronic DOS virus embeds itself in your computer’s memory and is activated on Friday the 13th. “Countdown to Extinction” displays on your screen then you see an 8-bit grim reaper marching across it. Mike Perry imagine what this virus might look like from inside the computer. Mike Perry

    Mike Perry

    Jay Wright illustrated the Madman virus, which is a DOS virus that infects .exe files. Whenever you hit CTRL-ALT-DEL the virus displays an ASCII picture of an red-faced man. Jay Wright

    Jay Wright

    Hort illustrated the Marburg virus, which infects .EXE and .SCR files and pops up the critical error sign. Hort

    Hort

    Darius Ou Dahao’s version of the ILOVEYOU email virus, which broke out in 2000 and spread to more than 50 million computers. Darius Ou Dahao

    Darius Ou Dahao

    Malware isn’t meant to be entertaining, and yet, many of the viruses that sneak their way into our computers are really just malicious displays of extreme creativity. We’ve said it before: There’s a strange beauty to computer viruses (especially the old-school DOS variety). And their backstories are even better.

    Bas van de Poel, a creative director living in Amsterdam, has long been fascinated by the nefarious subculture. “I’ve always been interested in the dark side of computing,” he says. “And I wondered how could I explore this area in a creative way?”

    Karborn’s illustration of the Bombshell virus, which infects your computer and erases your memory. The illustration was made using a Commodore 64. Karborn

    Van de Poel sent out a bunch of emails to his favorite illustrators with a proposal: Did any of them care to illustrate some of the most notorious viruses from the last few decades? They did, and the Computer Virus Catalog was born.

    Twenty-three artists from around the world interpreted the viruses; some more literally than others. “I think a lot of them were inspired by the super interesting backstories,” says van de Poel. There’s the Melissa virus, a dirty little worm that spreads via an attached email document. In 1999, the virus (named after its creator’s favorite exotic dancer) cause enough damage to prompt Microsoft to shut down outgoing email for a stint. Saimon Chow, a Brooklyn illustrator, depicted the virus as a collage of stripper heels and abstract nods to the female form.

    Then there’s the Selectronic DOS virus, which embeds itself in your computer’s memory and is activated on Friday the 13th. “Countdown to Extinction” would display, then you’d see an 8-bit grim reaper marching across your screen. Instead of illustrating the reaper himself, artist Mike Perry envisions what the virus might look like from the inside of the screen.

    Van de Poel says this is just the beginning of the ongoing project. He has a few more virus illustrations in the works, and already has an idea of what he’d like to see. “The stoned virus,” he says, referring to the late 1980s virus that infects your computer before displaying “Your PC is now Stoned!” “It’s a super funny virus. And I’m from Amsterdam, so it’s my heritage.”

    Article source: http://www.wired.com/2014/07/11-trippy-illustrations-of-historys-most-infamous-computer-viruses/

    ‘A gem in Silicon Valley’: Computer History Museum traces tech innovation


    In the future, perhaps sooner than expected, you might not be driving your car to work – your car could be driving you.

    The Computer History Museum in Mountain View has partnered with Google Inc. to showcase the advances of the self-driving car. Google’s revolutionary car, a detailed history of its development and a list of other autonomous vehicles are on display at the museum through November.

    The museum is dedicated to showcasing the past, present and future of technology and its effects on day-to-day living. The museum’s focus on the evolution of high-tech innovation positions it as a leader in the preservation and exploration of computing and technology. The nonprofit museum – home to the largest international collection of computing artifacts in the world – offers exhibits, speakers, guided tours and educational programs, including more than 350 events scheduled in the past year.

    The most recent visitor experience is “Fearless Genius: The Digital Revolution in Silicon Valley, 1985-2000.” The exhibit, featuring 50 photographs by Doug Menuez, a documentary photographer, runs through Sept. 7. The pictures tell the story of Menuez’s 15 years behind the scenes at companies such as Apple Inc. and Adobe Systems Inc., and document office life during the computing industry’s transition from analog to digital in Silicon Valley.

    Upcoming speakers at the museum include Akamai Technologies Inc. co-founder and CEO Tom Leighton in conversation with museum CEO John Hollar 6 p.m. Aug. 7.

    Tracing computer history

    Founded in 1979 in Marlborough, Mass., the Computer History Museum is now an asset to the Silicon Valley technological hub after relocating to Mountain View in 1996.

    The museum underwent a $19 million renovation in 2010 and reopened to the public in January 2011 to showcase its main exhibit, “Revolution: The First 2,000 Years of Computing.” The refurbishment doubled the exhibit space and added research and education components and a new digital platform.

    “The museum is kind of a gem in Silicon Valley,” said Carina Sweet, museum marketing manager.

    In its fourth decade providing a comprehensive history of computers and related technological advancements, the museum traces computer history that predates the introduction of the first modern computer via its more than 1,000 displays.

    The museum also functions as a research center, making current information available to the public through educational exhibits. Information at its offsite facility is accessible to researchers and students by appointment.

    “What we do is beyond the visitor experience,” Sweet said.

    Funded largely by individual donors, the museum also accepts corporate donations and grants. Its location in the heart of Silicon Valley encourages corporate partnerships with companies including Google, Intel Corp. and Cisco Systems Inc.

    “It is one of the most unique and relevant museums in the world – in fact, USA Today has already anointed us the ‘Valley’s answer to the Smithsonian,’” Sweet said.

    The Computer History Museum is located at 1401 N. Shoreline Blvd. in Mountain View. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesdays through Sundays and on the Labor Day holiday Sept. 1. General admission is $15, $12 for students, seniors and active military. Children 12 and under are free.

    For more information, visit computerhistory.org.




    Article source: http://www.losaltosonline.com/special-sections2/sections/mountain-view-on-the-move/47989-a-gem-in-silicon-valley-computer-history-museum-traces-tech-innovation

    Private Browsing Settings Aren’t as Private as You Think

    Let’s be honest: There’s probably a few things you’ve been looking at online that you don’t want anyone to know about.

    Whether you’re secretly searching for a gift for someone who uses your computer, planning a surprise event or just looking at websites you’d prefer to keep to yourself, there are plenty of reasons to want to keep your web history in the shadows.

    See also: Your Private Facebook Friends List Isn’t Actually That Private

    There a few different ways of doing this, and they all depend on who it is you want to hide your history from. But here’s the thing: The websites you visit in private browsing modes can still be tied back to you. Even if the people on your computer can’t see which websites you’ve been visiting, your Internet provider and the websites you’re visiting can. Here’s how it works.

    What private browsing modes do

    Private browsing modes will hide your history from other users on the same computer, but it will still be tied to your computer.

    Image: Mashable Composite, Search Influence on Wikimedia Commons

    Safari, Google Chrome, Firefox,Opera and Internet Explorer all have private browsing modes you can use to make sure the websites you visit don’t appear in your browsing history. Typically, your browser will record a running log of each website you visit and store information about what you entered into search and information forms on websites.

    So, if you found an awesome T-shirt on an online store, but can’t remember which store it was or what you searched to find it in the first place, your browser will store that information so you can use it later.

    Your browser will also store cookies from websites, which are small files of data that help tailor a website to you and your computer. Whenever you go to a website that already has you logged in, remembers what you were last looking at or displays ads that eerily fit what you’ve been searching for, that’s a cookie at work.

    See also: Official Report: NSA Spied on 89,138 ‘Targets’ Last Year

    When you enable private browsing modes, you are telling your browser not to record which websites you’re visiting, and telling it not to use or download any cookies. So, if you set up an account with an online jewelry store to find an engagement ring for your girlfriend, and she uses the same computer as you, she won’t be able to see any of that if you only do it in a private browsing mode.

    However, there are a few security flaws that can leak this information back onto your browser. In 2010, professors at Stanford University found that while Firefox won’t record your history during a private browsing session, it still records which sites on which you’ve installed SSL certificates (which enable secure, encrypted information exchange indicated by the “https” in front of the URL) and allowed specific permissions.

    So if you download an SSL certificate from a website or told that site specifically to stop displaying pop-ups and downloading cookies, all of that information is still stored on Firefox.

    Also, if you log into your Google account in Chrome’s Incognito mode, the browser will record your history and remember your cookies, which effectively ends the private session.

    Private browsing modes — by the admission of their developers — only try to hide your history from other users of the same computer, and there are still ways to get around that. If you’re looking for something that prevents anyone from tracking your browsing history, a normal browser isn’t going to cut it on its own.

    What private browsing modes don’t do

    Even if the private browsing mode doesn’t keep a record of which sites you visit, it’s still possible to track all of that information with your Internet Protocol (IP) address. Your IP address is both an identifier and a locator, telling the Internet who you are and from where in the world and on a computer network you’re connecting to the Internet.

    Any device that can access the Internet has an IP address, which is the Internet’s version of the return address on an mailed envelope. Whenever you send a request over the Internet, your IP address is included.

    Because every request sent over the Internet is tied to an IP address, anyone with the capacity to monitor which IP address sends requests to a server can figure out where you’ve been going online and to whom you’ve been sending messages. That’s how the NSA metadata collection program worked in a nutshell: The agency collected information about which IP addresses were sending requests to each other with the goal of figuring out the composition of terrorist networks.

    See also: Hackers Build Spy Tools From Leaked NSA Designs

    Private browsing settings can prevent your history from being recorded on your browser, but they cannot prevent your IP address from being tied to those requests. Your Internet provider, law enforcement much more local than the NSA and any website that can install tracking cookies or access your search history can track those requests. The federal government can legally request your Internet history, too.

    Also, anything you download and any bookmarks you make during a private browsing session will remain on your computer. Expecting those to go away when the session is over is like expecting a package you got in the mail to disappear just because you threw out its box. The file is now on your hard drive, and it will take a lot more than deleting your browser history to get rid if it.

    There’s no way to avoid using your IP address in an Internet request. However, there are ways to hide it.

    How to privately browse

    Tor creates a circuit that hides your Internet browsing history.

    Image: Wikimedia Commons Electronic Frontier Foundation

    Tor, previously known as The Onion Router, is a network that allows users to surf the web anonymously by routing your traffic through a series of computers before connecting you with your intended destination.

    You can find a comprehensive explanation of the technology behind Tor here, but essentially, the only computer that knows the start and end points of the request is yours. All of this together makes it so your request cannot be tied directly to your IP address, and even the NSA has difficulty getting into the system.

    See also: U.S. Privacy Watchdog Says NSA Spying Is ‘Valuable and Effective’

    No system is perfect, and there could be a security gap the NSA is exploiting that we don’t know about (remember Heartbleed?). But Tor has been around since 2005, and it’s done its job pretty well for the past decade.

    DuckDuckGo, a private search engine that doesn’t store your personal information, won’t send any of it to the websites you access through its service. While the websites will still know you visited them through your IP address, it won’t send the search phrases you used to them.

    This will prevent third-party cookies from associating certain phrases with you, and using DuckDuckGo will let you search the Internet without a filter constructed from previous browsing and information.

    Have something to add to this story? Share it in the comments.

    Article source: http://mashable.com/2014/07/21/how-private-browsing-works/

    Agency’s move in St. Louis leaves history behind

    Posted: Monday, July 21, 2014 1:12 pm

    Agency’s move in St. Louis leaves history behind

    Associated Press |


    0 comments

    ST. LOUIS (AP) — In the front parlor of a century-old mansion south of downtown sits a scale model of Osama bin Laden’s compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan. The model was used to brief U.S. generals before military forces raided the compound and killed the terrorist mastermind.

    Nearby is the now-famous photo of President Barack Obama and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, with her hand over her mouth, watching video of the top-secret mission unfold. Before them on the table are the maps created by the National Geospatial-Intelligence agency that aided the hunt.

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    Monday, July 21, 2014 1:12 pm.

    Article source: http://www.maryvilledailyforum.com/news/state_news/article_1795a343-4b2d-5a57-b2b2-1aaf1d806ed0.html