History’s worst computer viruses visualised as art


LSD

LSD is a DOS virus that displays a druggy video effect

Clay Hickson

  • “Computer viruses. We hate ‘em. Nevertheless, we remain
    fascinated by their evil plots. This fascination led to a new kind
    of art collection,” explains Bas van de Poel in the Computer Virus
    Catalog “About” section.

    The Computer Virus Catalog is a website displaying a range of
    artworks, each of which is based on or inspired by a famous
    computer-invading worm. It describes itself as an “illustrated
    guide to the worst computer viruses in history”. Every virus from
    Stuxnet — supposedly designed by the US and Israeli
    governments to attack Iranian nuclear facilities — to ILOVEYOU, which
    broke out in May 2000 and caused $10 billion in damages, is
    represented in the collection, and each has been illustrated by a
    different artist.

    “I approached artists whose work I really appreciate and have
    been following for a while. During the curation process I tried to
    create a nice mix of designers, illustrators and artists,” van de
    Poel explains to Wired.co.uk.

    It’s true that while viruses are notoriously and universally
    destructive, each has its own method and therefore its own story,
    and the damage to computers often also has a visual element to it
    as well. The Computer Virus Catalog is a thought-provoking
    collection that gets us to visualise each worm out of context and
    according to its nature, rather than generalising viruses as just
    one kind of evil.

    You can view
    the whole Computer Virus Catalog collection here.

    Article source: http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2014-07/23/the-computer-virus-catalog

  • 11 Trippy Illustrations of History’s Most Infamous Computer Viruses

    Nople virus by Merijn Hos depicts the Windows NT worm that spreads over local and shared network drives. When activated, the worm runs an animation that looks like a mass of fuzzy looking multi-colored strings and displays a note that’s translated to: “It’s time to format your disk.” Merijn Hos

    Merijn Hos

    This illustration of Stuxnet is by Mel Nguyen. The virus, created jointly by the U.S. and Israel, destroyed Iran’s nuclear centrifuges. Mel Nguyen

    Mel Nguyen

    The Melissa virus, as illustrated by Saiman Chow. This virus was named after its maker’s favorite stripper, hence the female motif. Saiman Chow.

    Saiman Chow.

    The Lichen virus by Jonathan Zawada depicts a sierpinski pyramid made of stones, covered in a glowing lichen which increases in frequency as the stones get smaller. The virus infects your computer’s .com and .exe files and activates a month later. Whenever there’s no keyboard activity for more than one minute, it produces lichen visualizations. Jonathan Zawada

    Jonathan Zawada

    Clay Hickson illustrated the LSD virus, which overwrites the files in your current directory and displays a rainbow animation across your screen. Clay Hickson

    Clay Hickson

    Illustrators Joost and Nick depicted the techno virus, which infects your computer and pumps out loud techno music while displaying the word TECHNO across your screen. Their version is a little more subtle. Joost and Nick

    Joost and Nick

    The Selectronic DOS virus embeds itself in your computer’s memory and is activated on Friday the 13th. “Countdown to Extinction” displays on your screen then you see an 8-bit grim reaper marching across it. Mike Perry imagine what this virus might look like from inside the computer. Mike Perry

    Mike Perry

    Jay Wright illustrated the Madman virus, which is a DOS virus that infects .exe files. Whenever you hit CTRL-ALT-DEL the virus displays an ASCII picture of an red-faced man. Jay Wright

    Jay Wright

    Hort illustrated the Marburg virus, which infects .EXE and .SCR files and pops up the critical error sign. Hort

    Hort

    Darius Ou Dahao’s version of the ILOVEYOU email virus, which broke out in 2000 and spread to more than 50 million computers. Darius Ou Dahao

    Darius Ou Dahao

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    Augmented Retaility

    Nople virus by Merijn Hos depicts the Windows NT worm that spreads over local and shared network drives. When activated, the worm runs an animation that looks like a mass of fuzzy looking multi-colored strings and displays a note that’s translated to: “It’s time to format your disk.” Merijn Hos

    Merijn Hos

    This illustration of Stuxnet is by Mel Nguyen. The virus, created jointly by the U.S. and Israel, destroyed Iran’s nuclear centrifuges. Mel Nguyen

    Mel Nguyen

    The Melissa virus, as illustrated by Saiman Chow. This virus was named after its maker’s favorite stripper, hence the female motif. Saiman Chow.

    Saiman Chow.

    The Lichen virus by Jonathan Zawada depicts a sierpinski pyramid made of stones, covered in a glowing lichen which increases in frequency as the stones get smaller. The virus infects your computer’s .com and .exe files and activates a month later. Whenever there’s no keyboard activity for more than one minute, it produces lichen visualizations. Jonathan Zawada

    Jonathan Zawada

    Clay Hickson illustrated the LSD virus, which overwrites the files in your current directory and displays a rainbow animation across your screen. Clay Hickson

    Clay Hickson

    Illustrators Joost and Nick depicted the techno virus, which infects your computer and pumps out loud techno music while displaying the word TECHNO across your screen. Their version is a little more subtle. Joost and Nick

    Joost and Nick

    The Selectronic DOS virus embeds itself in your computer’s memory and is activated on Friday the 13th. “Countdown to Extinction” displays on your screen then you see an 8-bit grim reaper marching across it. Mike Perry imagine what this virus might look like from inside the computer. Mike Perry

    Mike Perry

    Jay Wright illustrated the Madman virus, which is a DOS virus that infects .exe files. Whenever you hit CTRL-ALT-DEL the virus displays an ASCII picture of an red-faced man. Jay Wright

    Jay Wright

    Hort illustrated the Marburg virus, which infects .EXE and .SCR files and pops up the critical error sign. Hort

    Hort

    Darius Ou Dahao’s version of the ILOVEYOU email virus, which broke out in 2000 and spread to more than 50 million computers. Darius Ou Dahao

    Darius Ou Dahao

    Malware isn’t meant to be entertaining, and yet, many of the viruses that sneak their way into our computers are really just malicious displays of extreme creativity. We’ve said it before: There’s a strange beauty to computer viruses (especially the old-school DOS variety). And their backstories are even better.

    Bas van de Poel, a creative director living in Amsterdam, has long been fascinated by the nefarious subculture. “I’ve always been interested in the dark side of computing,” he says. “And I wondered how could I explore this area in a creative way?”

    Karborn’s illustration of the Bombshell virus, which infects your computer and erases your memory. The illustration was made using a Commodore 64. Karborn

    Van de Poel sent out a bunch of emails to his favorite illustrators with a proposal: Did any of them care to illustrate some of the most notorious viruses from the last few decades? They did, and the Computer Virus Catalog was born.

    Twenty-three artists from around the world interpreted the viruses; some more literally than others. “I think a lot of them were inspired by the super interesting backstories,” says van de Poel. There’s the Melissa virus, a dirty little worm that spreads via an attached email document. In 1999, the virus (named after its creator’s favorite exotic dancer) cause enough damage to prompt Microsoft to shut down outgoing email for a stint. Saimon Chow, a Brooklyn illustrator, depicted the virus as a collage of stripper heels and abstract nods to the female form.

    Then there’s the Selectronic DOS virus, which embeds itself in your computer’s memory and is activated on Friday the 13th. “Countdown to Extinction” would display, then you’d see an 8-bit grim reaper marching across your screen. Instead of illustrating the reaper himself, artist Mike Perry envisions what the virus might look like from the inside of the screen.

    Van de Poel says this is just the beginning of the ongoing project. He has a few more virus illustrations in the works, and already has an idea of what he’d like to see. “The stoned virus,” he says, referring to the late 1980s virus that infects your computer before displaying “Your PC is now Stoned!” “It’s a super funny virus. And I’m from Amsterdam, so it’s my heritage.”

    Article source: http://www.wired.com/2014/07/11-trippy-illustrations-of-historys-most-infamous-computer-viruses/

    ‘A gem in Silicon Valley’: Computer History Museum traces tech innovation


    In the future, perhaps sooner than expected, you might not be driving your car to work – your car could be driving you.

    The Computer History Museum in Mountain View has partnered with Google Inc. to showcase the advances of the self-driving car. Google’s revolutionary car, a detailed history of its development and a list of other autonomous vehicles are on display at the museum through November.

    The museum is dedicated to showcasing the past, present and future of technology and its effects on day-to-day living. The museum’s focus on the evolution of high-tech innovation positions it as a leader in the preservation and exploration of computing and technology. The nonprofit museum – home to the largest international collection of computing artifacts in the world – offers exhibits, speakers, guided tours and educational programs, including more than 350 events scheduled in the past year.

    The most recent visitor experience is “Fearless Genius: The Digital Revolution in Silicon Valley, 1985-2000.” The exhibit, featuring 50 photographs by Doug Menuez, a documentary photographer, runs through Sept. 7. The pictures tell the story of Menuez’s 15 years behind the scenes at companies such as Apple Inc. and Adobe Systems Inc., and document office life during the computing industry’s transition from analog to digital in Silicon Valley.

    Upcoming speakers at the museum include Akamai Technologies Inc. co-founder and CEO Tom Leighton in conversation with museum CEO John Hollar 6 p.m. Aug. 7.

    Tracing computer history

    Founded in 1979 in Marlborough, Mass., the Computer History Museum is now an asset to the Silicon Valley technological hub after relocating to Mountain View in 1996.

    The museum underwent a $19 million renovation in 2010 and reopened to the public in January 2011 to showcase its main exhibit, “Revolution: The First 2,000 Years of Computing.” The refurbishment doubled the exhibit space and added research and education components and a new digital platform.

    “The museum is kind of a gem in Silicon Valley,” said Carina Sweet, museum marketing manager.

    In its fourth decade providing a comprehensive history of computers and related technological advancements, the museum traces computer history that predates the introduction of the first modern computer via its more than 1,000 displays.

    The museum also functions as a research center, making current information available to the public through educational exhibits. Information at its offsite facility is accessible to researchers and students by appointment.

    “What we do is beyond the visitor experience,” Sweet said.

    Funded largely by individual donors, the museum also accepts corporate donations and grants. Its location in the heart of Silicon Valley encourages corporate partnerships with companies including Google, Intel Corp. and Cisco Systems Inc.

    “It is one of the most unique and relevant museums in the world – in fact, USA Today has already anointed us the ‘Valley’s answer to the Smithsonian,’” Sweet said.

    The Computer History Museum is located at 1401 N. Shoreline Blvd. in Mountain View. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesdays through Sundays and on the Labor Day holiday Sept. 1. General admission is $15, $12 for students, seniors and active military. Children 12 and under are free.

    For more information, visit computerhistory.org.




    Article source: http://www.losaltosonline.com/special-sections2/sections/mountain-view-on-the-move/47989-a-gem-in-silicon-valley-computer-history-museum-traces-tech-innovation

    Private Browsing Settings Aren’t as Private as You Think

    Let’s be honest: There’s probably a few things you’ve been looking at online that you don’t want anyone to know about.

    Whether you’re secretly searching for a gift for someone who uses your computer, planning a surprise event or just looking at websites you’d prefer to keep to yourself, there are plenty of reasons to want to keep your web history in the shadows.

    See also: Your Private Facebook Friends List Isn’t Actually That Private

    There a few different ways of doing this, and they all depend on who it is you want to hide your history from. But here’s the thing: The websites you visit in private browsing modes can still be tied back to you. Even if the people on your computer can’t see which websites you’ve been visiting, your Internet provider and the websites you’re visiting can. Here’s how it works.

    What private browsing modes do

    Private browsing modes will hide your history from other users on the same computer, but it will still be tied to your computer.

    Image: Mashable Composite, Search Influence on Wikimedia Commons

    Safari, Google Chrome, Firefox,Opera and Internet Explorer all have private browsing modes you can use to make sure the websites you visit don’t appear in your browsing history. Typically, your browser will record a running log of each website you visit and store information about what you entered into search and information forms on websites.

    So, if you found an awesome T-shirt on an online store, but can’t remember which store it was or what you searched to find it in the first place, your browser will store that information so you can use it later.

    Your browser will also store cookies from websites, which are small files of data that help tailor a website to you and your computer. Whenever you go to a website that already has you logged in, remembers what you were last looking at or displays ads that eerily fit what you’ve been searching for, that’s a cookie at work.

    See also: Official Report: NSA Spied on 89,138 ‘Targets’ Last Year

    When you enable private browsing modes, you are telling your browser not to record which websites you’re visiting, and telling it not to use or download any cookies. So, if you set up an account with an online jewelry store to find an engagement ring for your girlfriend, and she uses the same computer as you, she won’t be able to see any of that if you only do it in a private browsing mode.

    However, there are a few security flaws that can leak this information back onto your browser. In 2010, professors at Stanford University found that while Firefox won’t record your history during a private browsing session, it still records which sites on which you’ve installed SSL certificates (which enable secure, encrypted information exchange indicated by the “https” in front of the URL) and allowed specific permissions.

    So if you download an SSL certificate from a website or told that site specifically to stop displaying pop-ups and downloading cookies, all of that information is still stored on Firefox.

    Also, if you log into your Google account in Chrome’s Incognito mode, the browser will record your history and remember your cookies, which effectively ends the private session.

    Private browsing modes — by the admission of their developers — only try to hide your history from other users of the same computer, and there are still ways to get around that. If you’re looking for something that prevents anyone from tracking your browsing history, a normal browser isn’t going to cut it on its own.

    What private browsing modes don’t do

    Even if the private browsing mode doesn’t keep a record of which sites you visit, it’s still possible to track all of that information with your Internet Protocol (IP) address. Your IP address is both an identifier and a locator, telling the Internet who you are and from where in the world and on a computer network you’re connecting to the Internet.

    Any device that can access the Internet has an IP address, which is the Internet’s version of the return address on an mailed envelope. Whenever you send a request over the Internet, your IP address is included.

    Because every request sent over the Internet is tied to an IP address, anyone with the capacity to monitor which IP address sends requests to a server can figure out where you’ve been going online and to whom you’ve been sending messages. That’s how the NSA metadata collection program worked in a nutshell: The agency collected information about which IP addresses were sending requests to each other with the goal of figuring out the composition of terrorist networks.

    See also: Hackers Build Spy Tools From Leaked NSA Designs

    Private browsing settings can prevent your history from being recorded on your browser, but they cannot prevent your IP address from being tied to those requests. Your Internet provider, law enforcement much more local than the NSA and any website that can install tracking cookies or access your search history can track those requests. The federal government can legally request your Internet history, too.

    Also, anything you download and any bookmarks you make during a private browsing session will remain on your computer. Expecting those to go away when the session is over is like expecting a package you got in the mail to disappear just because you threw out its box. The file is now on your hard drive, and it will take a lot more than deleting your browser history to get rid if it.

    There’s no way to avoid using your IP address in an Internet request. However, there are ways to hide it.

    How to privately browse

    Tor creates a circuit that hides your Internet browsing history.

    Image: Wikimedia Commons Electronic Frontier Foundation

    Tor, previously known as The Onion Router, is a network that allows users to surf the web anonymously by routing your traffic through a series of computers before connecting you with your intended destination.

    You can find a comprehensive explanation of the technology behind Tor here, but essentially, the only computer that knows the start and end points of the request is yours. All of this together makes it so your request cannot be tied directly to your IP address, and even the NSA has difficulty getting into the system.

    See also: U.S. Privacy Watchdog Says NSA Spying Is ‘Valuable and Effective’

    No system is perfect, and there could be a security gap the NSA is exploiting that we don’t know about (remember Heartbleed?). But Tor has been around since 2005, and it’s done its job pretty well for the past decade.

    DuckDuckGo, a private search engine that doesn’t store your personal information, won’t send any of it to the websites you access through its service. While the websites will still know you visited them through your IP address, it won’t send the search phrases you used to them.

    This will prevent third-party cookies from associating certain phrases with you, and using DuckDuckGo will let you search the Internet without a filter constructed from previous browsing and information.

    Have something to add to this story? Share it in the comments.

    Article source: http://mashable.com/2014/07/21/how-private-browsing-works/

    Agency’s move in St. Louis leaves history behind

    Posted: Monday, July 21, 2014 1:12 pm

    Agency’s move in St. Louis leaves history behind

    Associated Press |


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    ST. LOUIS (AP) — In the front parlor of a century-old mansion south of downtown sits a scale model of Osama bin Laden’s compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan. The model was used to brief U.S. generals before military forces raided the compound and killed the terrorist mastermind.

    Nearby is the now-famous photo of President Barack Obama and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, with her hand over her mouth, watching video of the top-secret mission unfold. Before them on the table are the maps created by the National Geospatial-Intelligence agency that aided the hunt.

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    Monday, July 21, 2014 1:12 pm.

    Article source: http://www.maryvilledailyforum.com/news/state_news/article_1795a343-4b2d-5a57-b2b2-1aaf1d806ed0.html

    Display documents Indianapolis airport history

    Posted: Monday, July 21, 2014 3:02 am
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    Updated: 6:03 am, Mon Jul 21, 2014.

    Display documents Indianapolis airport history

    Associated Press |


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    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Photographs and news clippings detailing the history of the Indianapolis International Airport are on display at the Eugene and Marilyn Glick Indiana History Center.

    The display highlights the history of the airport, which opened in 1931 as Indianapolis Municipal Airport and was known for years as Weir Cook Municipal Airport in honor of World War I pilot Harvey Weir Cook. The current airport’s terminal is named after the pilot.

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    Monday, July 21, 2014 3:02 am.

    Updated: 6:03 am.

    Article source: http://www.thenewsdispatch.com/news/indiana_state_news/article_1b736f2b-07e5-50c1-8a12-3ce092066324.html

    Shropshire worker denies downloading child porn on office computer

    Police computer experts found a total of 131 indecent images of children had been created on Steven Yates’s computer at the office of McCartneys in Ludlow, Shrewsbury Crown Court was told yesterday.

    Yates, 58, of Burford, Tenbury Wells, denies four counts of making indecent photographs of children between January 2010 and July 2012.

    The court was told Yates had denied knowing about the images, telling police other staff had access to his computer.

    Jurors were told the allegations came to light after a witness believed she had seen an image of a topless woman on Yates’s computer while he was sitting at his desk.

    Bosses at the firm examined the computer and his internet search history, suspended Yates and called in the police.

    Cross examining for the prosecution, Mr Phillip Beardwell suggested to Yates he deleted his internet search history after he realised the witness had spotted what he had been looking at.

    Mr Beardwell said: “You had been caught out.”

    Yates denied the claims and denied he was responsible for child porn images and said other people were able to work on his computer.

    The trial continues.

    Article source: http://www.shropshirestar.com/news/2014/07/18/shropshire-worker-denies-downloading-child-porn-on-office-computer/

    How to Delete Your Internet Browser History

    There are many reasons to delete your internet browser history. No matter what reason you choose, here’s how to delete it and hide your tracks.

    First off, it’s important to note that your browser history and search history are two different things. This how-to guide will show you how to delete your browser history, but we also have a guide on how to delete your Google Search history as well.

    Unless you browse with Incognito Mode  or Private Browsing Mode enabled, every single website you visit is saved in the web browser’s history. This can be a convenient feature to have, as it allows you to go back and find a website that you may have forgotten weeks later.

    Furthermore, having a browser history makes it easier and quicker to browse the web in the first place. When a web browser saves your history, it saves the URLs as well, so when you go to type in a web address, your web browser will automatically fill it in if you’ve visited that website before.

    Image Credit: Oliver

    However, you may not want your web browser to save your browsing history, and we don’t blame you. Not only does it show what websites you’ve visited, but storing all of that information takes up storage space on your computer, and if you’re quickly running out of disk space, clearing your browser’s history and cache is a good place to start.

    Here’s how you can delete your web browsing history on your desktop or laptop computer, with instructions for Chrome, Firefox and Safari.

    Google Chrome

    • On Mac, start by clicking on History in the menubar at the top and selecting Show Full History at the bottom. On Windows, you’ll click the menu button in the upper-right corner and then click History.
    • Next, click Clear browsing data….
    • You’ll want to checkmark Browsing history, but you can also checkmark other options in the list while you’re at it.
    • You can also select how far back you want your browsing history deleted using the drop-down menu next to Obliterate the following items from:.
    • Once you’re happy with your selections, go ahead and click Clear browsing data.

    Mozilla Firefox

    • On Mac, start by clicking on History in the menubar at the top and selecting Clear Recent History…. On Windows, click the orange Firefox button in the upper-left corner and navigate to History Clear Recent History….
    • You’ll want to make sure that Browsing Download History is checkmarked, but you can you also checkmark other items that you want to delete as well.
    • You can also select how far back you want your browsing history deleted using the drop-down menu next to Time range to clear:.
    • Once you’re happy with your selections, go ahead and click Clear Now.

    Safari

    Apple makes it a bit easier and much more no-frills to delete your internet browsing history.

    • Simply click on History in the menubar at the top, and then click Clear History… at the bottom of the drop-down menu.
    • You’ll get a pop-up prompt confirming the action. Click Clear to confirm and delete your browsing history.

    Protect Yourself Next Time

    If you don’t want your web browser to save your browsing history in the first place, be sure to open up a new window in Incognito Mode or Private Browsing Mode. This will make sure that any websites you visit don’t get saved to your history.

    You can change the settings around so that your web browser doesn’t save any of your browsing history at all, even if you’re not in Private Browsing Mode. This settings can usually be found within the browser history menus where you erased your browsing history.

    Article source: http://www.gottabemobile.com/2014/07/17/how-to-delete-your-internet-browser-history/

    Building a virtual world, and computer skills, at Minecraft camp


    7-14-2014, Siena College Minecraft camp. center, Michele McColgan, Ph.D., with (left) 10 year old Chase Mancini 11 year old Marcus Bollacker






    Megan Rogers
    Reporter- Albany Business Review

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    Matt Kearney built fire at summer camp and he didn’t need matches or a lighter. He used his computer science and physics skills.

    Kearney, a 15-year-old sophomore at Shaker High School, is one of about 80 students at a Minecraft-themed camp at Siena College, a private, liberal arts college in Loudonville, New York.

    Minecraft is a computer game, but because it is so open ended, and doesn’t have many explicit goals, it defies explanation. The game takes players to a virtual world where they can build everything from houses to restaurants. In creative mode, players enhance their worlds by building such things with blocks. In other modes, they battle each other online.

    The game’s rudimentary, pixilated graphics buck the trend of polished, lifelike games that dominate much of the industry.

    In the words of 13-year-old-camper Ben McColgan, Minecraft lets you “make your own society.”

    “It’s almost like training for what you can do in real life,” he says.

    Campers used Java programming to add to and manipulate the Minecraft world. To build an object, like a sword or fire, Kearney and his peers design the sword and create its ‘recipe’ so Minecraft players can build the object when the game is live. Last week, younger campers calculated their speed in the real-world and compared that with their Minecraft speed.

    “They think they’re playing Minecraft, but to be successful, they have to learn some computer science and Java code to be successful,” says Al Andrade, the director of the urban scholars program at Siena.

    The curriculum was designed by Michele McColgan, a Siena College physics professor, who has led the camps for the past seven years. She developed the Minecraft curriculum after seeing how it grabbed her son’s attention.

    “Kids go to sports camp and say, ‘I love Siena,’” she says. “I want them to say that because of our science programs.”

    Curriculum is designed to be self-directed, so students can work at individual paces and “feel the exponential growth of learning every day,” she says.

    High school and college students work as mentors alongside the campers. Two Siena College physics graduates led the lesson on designing, coding and introducing fire into Minecraft. A Siena College history student helped develop the curriculum for the history portion, where campers built a virtual Revolutionary War campsite.

    This is the second and final week of Minecraft camps. The camps cost $300 per week and run from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. each day.

    Megan reports breaking news and covers education.


    Article source: http://www.bizjournals.com/albany/morning_call/2014/07/building-a-virtual-world-and-computer-skills-at.html?page=all

    Dorky, Snarky Artistic Interpretations of Famous Computer Viruses

    In the fanciful “Computer Virus Catalogue,” you’ll find weird artistic interpretations of some of the most well-known computer viruses in history. They range from very literal to extremely surreal — and most capture the destructive, adolescent spirit that drives people to make viruses in the first place. (Mildly NSFW)

    Above, you can see Saïd Kinos‘ interpretation of the Ika-Tako virus, which disguised itself as a music file on P2P networks, and replaced as many files as it could with pictures of squid.

    I love this interpretation of the Cookie Monster virus by Lawrence Slater, because I always imagine virus writers reading that exact book. Cookie Monster was the first computer virus, created in the 1960s, which froze people’s machines and demanded cookies.

    You can’t have a virus art show without Stuxnet, and here it is, imagined by Mel Nguyen as a terrifying-looking version of a biological virus crossed with a psychedelic version of an old Donkey Kong game. Stuxnet was a Windows worm created as a weapon by the U.S. and Israeli governments, to infect computers associated with Iran’s nuclear power plants.

    Yep, this is pretty much how I imagine every computer virus. This is the infamous Sircam worm, imagined by artist Alyar Aynetchi. The worm’s main goal in life was to send an email message containing these exact words to every contact in your Outlook email manager. Yay!

    See more incredibly goofy interpretations of viruses and worms over at the Computer Virus Catalogue.

    Article source: http://io9.com/if-computer-viruses-were-made-by-artists-this-is-how-t-1606256591