Private Browsing Settings Aren’t as Private as You Think

Let’s be honest: There’s probably a few things you’ve been looking at online that you don’t want anyone to know about.

Whether you’re secretly searching for a gift for someone who uses your computer, planning a surprise event or just looking at websites you’d prefer to keep to yourself, there are plenty of reasons to want to keep your web history in the shadows.

See also: Your Private Facebook Friends List Isn’t Actually That Private

There a few different ways of doing this, and they all depend on who it is you want to hide your history from. But here’s the thing: The websites you visit in private browsing modes can still be tied back to you. Even if the people on your computer can’t see which websites you’ve been visiting, your Internet provider and the websites you’re visiting can. Here’s how it works.

What private browsing modes do

Private browsing modes will hide your history from other users on the same computer, but it will still be tied to your computer.

Image: Mashable Composite, Search Influence on Wikimedia Commons

Safari, Google Chrome, Firefox,Opera and Internet Explorer all have private browsing modes you can use to make sure the websites you visit don’t appear in your browsing history. Typically, your browser will record a running log of each website you visit and store information about what you entered into search and information forms on websites.

So, if you found an awesome T-shirt on an online store, but can’t remember which store it was or what you searched to find it in the first place, your browser will store that information so you can use it later.

Your browser will also store cookies from websites, which are small files of data that help tailor a website to you and your computer. Whenever you go to a website that already has you logged in, remembers what you were last looking at or displays ads that eerily fit what you’ve been searching for, that’s a cookie at work.

See also: Official Report: NSA Spied on 89,138 ‘Targets’ Last Year

When you enable private browsing modes, you are telling your browser not to record which websites you’re visiting, and telling it not to use or download any cookies. So, if you set up an account with an online jewelry store to find an engagement ring for your girlfriend, and she uses the same computer as you, she won’t be able to see any of that if you only do it in a private browsing mode.

However, there are a few security flaws that can leak this information back onto your browser. In 2010, professors at Stanford University found that while Firefox won’t record your history during a private browsing session, it still records which sites on which you’ve installed SSL certificates (which enable secure, encrypted information exchange indicated by the “https” in front of the URL) and allowed specific permissions.

So if you download an SSL certificate from a website or told that site specifically to stop displaying pop-ups and downloading cookies, all of that information is still stored on Firefox.

Also, if you log into your Google account in Chrome’s Incognito mode, the browser will record your history and remember your cookies, which effectively ends the private session.

Private browsing modes — by the admission of their developers — only try to hide your history from other users of the same computer, and there are still ways to get around that. If you’re looking for something that prevents anyone from tracking your browsing history, a normal browser isn’t going to cut it on its own.

What private browsing modes don’t do

Even if the private browsing mode doesn’t keep a record of which sites you visit, it’s still possible to track all of that information with your Internet Protocol (IP) address. Your IP address is both an identifier and a locator, telling the Internet who you are and from where in the world and on a computer network you’re connecting to the Internet.

Any device that can access the Internet has an IP address, which is the Internet’s version of the return address on an mailed envelope. Whenever you send a request over the Internet, your IP address is included.

Because every request sent over the Internet is tied to an IP address, anyone with the capacity to monitor which IP address sends requests to a server can figure out where you’ve been going online and to whom you’ve been sending messages. That’s how the NSA metadata collection program worked in a nutshell: The agency collected information about which IP addresses were sending requests to each other with the goal of figuring out the composition of terrorist networks.

See also: Hackers Build Spy Tools From Leaked NSA Designs

Private browsing settings can prevent your history from being recorded on your browser, but they cannot prevent your IP address from being tied to those requests. Your Internet provider, law enforcement much more local than the NSA and any website that can install tracking cookies or access your search history can track those requests. The federal government can legally request your Internet history, too.

Also, anything you download and any bookmarks you make during a private browsing session will remain on your computer. Expecting those to go away when the session is over is like expecting a package you got in the mail to disappear just because you threw out its box. The file is now on your hard drive, and it will take a lot more than deleting your browser history to get rid if it.

There’s no way to avoid using your IP address in an Internet request. However, there are ways to hide it.

How to privately browse

Tor creates a circuit that hides your Internet browsing history.

Image: Wikimedia Commons Electronic Frontier Foundation

Tor, previously known as The Onion Router, is a network that allows users to surf the web anonymously by routing your traffic through a series of computers before connecting you with your intended destination.

You can find a comprehensive explanation of the technology behind Tor here, but essentially, the only computer that knows the start and end points of the request is yours. All of this together makes it so your request cannot be tied directly to your IP address, and even the NSA has difficulty getting into the system.

See also: U.S. Privacy Watchdog Says NSA Spying Is ‘Valuable and Effective’

No system is perfect, and there could be a security gap the NSA is exploiting that we don’t know about (remember Heartbleed?). But Tor has been around since 2005, and it’s done its job pretty well for the past decade.

DuckDuckGo, a private search engine that doesn’t store your personal information, won’t send any of it to the websites you access through its service. While the websites will still know you visited them through your IP address, it won’t send the search phrases you used to them.

This will prevent third-party cookies from associating certain phrases with you, and using DuckDuckGo will let you search the Internet without a filter constructed from previous browsing and information.

Have something to add to this story? Share it in the comments.

Article source: http://mashable.com/2014/07/21/how-private-browsing-works/

Agency’s move in St. Louis leaves history behind

Posted: Monday, July 21, 2014 1:12 pm

Agency’s move in St. Louis leaves history behind

Associated Press |


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ST. LOUIS (AP) — In the front parlor of a century-old mansion south of downtown sits a scale model of Osama bin Laden’s compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan. The model was used to brief U.S. generals before military forces raided the compound and killed the terrorist mastermind.

Nearby is the now-famous photo of President Barack Obama and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, with her hand over her mouth, watching video of the top-secret mission unfold. Before them on the table are the maps created by the National Geospatial-Intelligence agency that aided the hunt.

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Monday, July 21, 2014 1:12 pm.

Article source: http://www.maryvilledailyforum.com/news/state_news/article_1795a343-4b2d-5a57-b2b2-1aaf1d806ed0.html

Display documents Indianapolis airport history

Posted: Monday, July 21, 2014 3:02 am
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Updated: 6:03 am, Mon Jul 21, 2014.

Display documents Indianapolis airport history

Associated Press |


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INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Photographs and news clippings detailing the history of the Indianapolis International Airport are on display at the Eugene and Marilyn Glick Indiana History Center.

The display highlights the history of the airport, which opened in 1931 as Indianapolis Municipal Airport and was known for years as Weir Cook Municipal Airport in honor of World War I pilot Harvey Weir Cook. The current airport’s terminal is named after the pilot.

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Monday, July 21, 2014 3:02 am.

Updated: 6:03 am.

Article source: http://www.thenewsdispatch.com/news/indiana_state_news/article_1b736f2b-07e5-50c1-8a12-3ce092066324.html

Shropshire worker denies downloading child porn on office computer

Police computer experts found a total of 131 indecent images of children had been created on Steven Yates’s computer at the office of McCartneys in Ludlow, Shrewsbury Crown Court was told yesterday.

Yates, 58, of Burford, Tenbury Wells, denies four counts of making indecent photographs of children between January 2010 and July 2012.

The court was told Yates had denied knowing about the images, telling police other staff had access to his computer.

Jurors were told the allegations came to light after a witness believed she had seen an image of a topless woman on Yates’s computer while he was sitting at his desk.

Bosses at the firm examined the computer and his internet search history, suspended Yates and called in the police.

Cross examining for the prosecution, Mr Phillip Beardwell suggested to Yates he deleted his internet search history after he realised the witness had spotted what he had been looking at.

Mr Beardwell said: “You had been caught out.”

Yates denied the claims and denied he was responsible for child porn images and said other people were able to work on his computer.

The trial continues.

Article source: http://www.shropshirestar.com/news/2014/07/18/shropshire-worker-denies-downloading-child-porn-on-office-computer/

How to Delete Your Internet Browser History

There are many reasons to delete your internet browser history. No matter what reason you choose, here’s how to delete it and hide your tracks.

First off, it’s important to note that your browser history and search history are two different things. This how-to guide will show you how to delete your browser history, but we also have a guide on how to delete your Google Search history as well.

Unless you browse with Incognito Mode  or Private Browsing Mode enabled, every single website you visit is saved in the web browser’s history. This can be a convenient feature to have, as it allows you to go back and find a website that you may have forgotten weeks later.

Furthermore, having a browser history makes it easier and quicker to browse the web in the first place. When a web browser saves your history, it saves the URLs as well, so when you go to type in a web address, your web browser will automatically fill it in if you’ve visited that website before.

Image Credit: Oliver

However, you may not want your web browser to save your browsing history, and we don’t blame you. Not only does it show what websites you’ve visited, but storing all of that information takes up storage space on your computer, and if you’re quickly running out of disk space, clearing your browser’s history and cache is a good place to start.

Here’s how you can delete your web browsing history on your desktop or laptop computer, with instructions for Chrome, Firefox and Safari.

Google Chrome

  • On Mac, start by clicking on History in the menubar at the top and selecting Show Full History at the bottom. On Windows, you’ll click the menu button in the upper-right corner and then click History.
  • Next, click Clear browsing data….
  • You’ll want to checkmark Browsing history, but you can also checkmark other options in the list while you’re at it.
  • You can also select how far back you want your browsing history deleted using the drop-down menu next to Obliterate the following items from:.
  • Once you’re happy with your selections, go ahead and click Clear browsing data.

Mozilla Firefox

  • On Mac, start by clicking on History in the menubar at the top and selecting Clear Recent History…. On Windows, click the orange Firefox button in the upper-left corner and navigate to History Clear Recent History….
  • You’ll want to make sure that Browsing Download History is checkmarked, but you can you also checkmark other items that you want to delete as well.
  • You can also select how far back you want your browsing history deleted using the drop-down menu next to Time range to clear:.
  • Once you’re happy with your selections, go ahead and click Clear Now.

Safari

Apple makes it a bit easier and much more no-frills to delete your internet browsing history.

  • Simply click on History in the menubar at the top, and then click Clear History… at the bottom of the drop-down menu.
  • You’ll get a pop-up prompt confirming the action. Click Clear to confirm and delete your browsing history.

Protect Yourself Next Time

If you don’t want your web browser to save your browsing history in the first place, be sure to open up a new window in Incognito Mode or Private Browsing Mode. This will make sure that any websites you visit don’t get saved to your history.

You can change the settings around so that your web browser doesn’t save any of your browsing history at all, even if you’re not in Private Browsing Mode. This settings can usually be found within the browser history menus where you erased your browsing history.

Article source: http://www.gottabemobile.com/2014/07/17/how-to-delete-your-internet-browser-history/

Building a virtual world, and computer skills, at Minecraft camp


7-14-2014, Siena College Minecraft camp. center, Michele McColgan, Ph.D., with (left) 10 year old Chase Mancini 11 year old Marcus Bollacker






Megan Rogers
Reporter- Albany Business Review

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Matt Kearney built fire at summer camp and he didn’t need matches or a lighter. He used his computer science and physics skills.

Kearney, a 15-year-old sophomore at Shaker High School, is one of about 80 students at a Minecraft-themed camp at Siena College, a private, liberal arts college in Loudonville, New York.

Minecraft is a computer game, but because it is so open ended, and doesn’t have many explicit goals, it defies explanation. The game takes players to a virtual world where they can build everything from houses to restaurants. In creative mode, players enhance their worlds by building such things with blocks. In other modes, they battle each other online.

The game’s rudimentary, pixilated graphics buck the trend of polished, lifelike games that dominate much of the industry.

In the words of 13-year-old-camper Ben McColgan, Minecraft lets you “make your own society.”

“It’s almost like training for what you can do in real life,” he says.

Campers used Java programming to add to and manipulate the Minecraft world. To build an object, like a sword or fire, Kearney and his peers design the sword and create its ‘recipe’ so Minecraft players can build the object when the game is live. Last week, younger campers calculated their speed in the real-world and compared that with their Minecraft speed.

“They think they’re playing Minecraft, but to be successful, they have to learn some computer science and Java code to be successful,” says Al Andrade, the director of the urban scholars program at Siena.

The curriculum was designed by Michele McColgan, a Siena College physics professor, who has led the camps for the past seven years. She developed the Minecraft curriculum after seeing how it grabbed her son’s attention.

“Kids go to sports camp and say, ‘I love Siena,’” she says. “I want them to say that because of our science programs.”

Curriculum is designed to be self-directed, so students can work at individual paces and “feel the exponential growth of learning every day,” she says.

High school and college students work as mentors alongside the campers. Two Siena College physics graduates led the lesson on designing, coding and introducing fire into Minecraft. A Siena College history student helped develop the curriculum for the history portion, where campers built a virtual Revolutionary War campsite.

This is the second and final week of Minecraft camps. The camps cost $300 per week and run from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. each day.

Megan reports breaking news and covers education.


Article source: http://www.bizjournals.com/albany/morning_call/2014/07/building-a-virtual-world-and-computer-skills-at.html?page=all

Dorky, Snarky Artistic Interpretations of Famous Computer Viruses

In the fanciful “Computer Virus Catalogue,” you’ll find weird artistic interpretations of some of the most well-known computer viruses in history. They range from very literal to extremely surreal — and most capture the destructive, adolescent spirit that drives people to make viruses in the first place. (Mildly NSFW)

Above, you can see Saïd Kinos‘ interpretation of the Ika-Tako virus, which disguised itself as a music file on P2P networks, and replaced as many files as it could with pictures of squid.

I love this interpretation of the Cookie Monster virus by Lawrence Slater, because I always imagine virus writers reading that exact book. Cookie Monster was the first computer virus, created in the 1960s, which froze people’s machines and demanded cookies.

You can’t have a virus art show without Stuxnet, and here it is, imagined by Mel Nguyen as a terrifying-looking version of a biological virus crossed with a psychedelic version of an old Donkey Kong game. Stuxnet was a Windows worm created as a weapon by the U.S. and Israeli governments, to infect computers associated with Iran’s nuclear power plants.

Yep, this is pretty much how I imagine every computer virus. This is the infamous Sircam worm, imagined by artist Alyar Aynetchi. The worm’s main goal in life was to send an email message containing these exact words to every contact in your Outlook email manager. Yay!

See more incredibly goofy interpretations of viruses and worms over at the Computer Virus Catalogue.

Article source: http://io9.com/if-computer-viruses-were-made-by-artists-this-is-how-t-1606256591

Building a virtual world, and computer skills, at Minecraft camp


7-14-2014, Siena College Minecraft camp. center, Michele McColgan, Ph.D., with (left) 10 year old Chase Mancini 11 year old Marcus Bollacker






Megan Rogers
Reporter- Albany Business Review

Email
 | 
LinkedIn
 | 
Twitter

Matt Kearney built fire at summer camp and he didn’t need matches or a lighter. He used his computer science and physics skills.

Kearney, a 15-year-old sophomore at Shaker High School, is one of about 80 students at a Minecraft-themed camp at Siena College, a private, liberal arts college in Loudonville, New York.

Minecraft is a computer game, but because it is so open ended, and doesn’t have many explicit goals, it defies explanation. The game takes players to a virtual world where they can build everything from houses to restaurants. In creative mode, players enhance their worlds by building such things with blocks. In other modes, they battle each other online.

The game’s rudimentary, pixilated graphics buck the trend of polished, lifelike games that dominate much of the industry.

In the words of 13-year-old-camper Ben McColgan, Minecraft lets you “make your own society.”

“It’s almost like training for what you can do in real life,” he says.

Campers used Java programming to add to and manipulate the Minecraft world. To build an object, like a sword or fire, Kearney and his peers design the sword and create its ‘recipe’ so Minecraft players can build the object when the game is live. Last week, younger campers calculated their speed in the real-world and compared that with their Minecraft speed.

“They think they’re playing Minecraft, but to be successful, they have to learn some computer science and Java code to be successful,” says Al Andrade, the director of the urban scholars program at Siena.

The curriculum was designed by Michele McColgan, a Siena College physics professor, who has led the camps for the past seven years. She developed the Minecraft curriculum after seeing how it grabbed her son’s attention.

Megan reports breaking news and covers education.


Article source: http://www.bizjournals.com/albany/morning_call/2014/07/building-a-virtual-world-and-computer-skills-at.html

Visualized: The Weirdest, Wildest Viruses In Computer History

Founded and curated by Amsterdam-based writer Bas Van de Poel, the Computer Virus Catalog collects the weirdest viruses from the annals of computer history, and visualizes them as art. By pairing a computer virus with a graphic designer, Van de Poel’s project is a wonderful tribute to the history of chaos, computers, and code.

Most computer viruses today operate with the sole purpose of making money; surreptitious programs that sit on your computer, slurp up your credit card numbers, or trojans that turn your computer into zombie slaves devoted to harvesting bitcoin. But that’s not what writing a computer virus used to be about.

The weirdest viruses in the annals of computing weren’t written to make money. They were written by tech-savvy agents of chaos, and their motivations were simple: to subvert the dependable logic and order of computing on as massive a scale as possible. They were almost works of art in their own right.

Lawrence Slate, Cookie Monster

Consider the first computer virus, Cookie Monster. Created in the late 1960s, the virus was mostly harmless. Incessantly demanding cookies, the malware would freeze your computer until you satiated its appetite by typing the word “cookie” at the prompt. For the Computer Virus Catalog, this virus is captured by artist Lawrence Slate as a rampaging blue muppet, reading a Computer Viruses for Dummies book, all done in the style of art from the ’60s.

And many of the best viruses invaded the DOS operating system in the ’80s and ’90s. The Techno virus, for example, would corrupt programs, taking over the system audio to blare a techno track while scrawling the word “Techno” on the screen, but only one out of every 10 times, driving infected users to question their own sanity when they couldn’t reproduce the effect. Joost Nick represent this as a bitmap rave between Tron-like dancers.

Jonathan Zawada, Lichen

Similarly, the Lichen virus infected programs, then only activated one month later; whenever there was no keyboard activity in an app for longer than a minute, the virus produced “lichen inspired visuals best described as kryptonite on crack.” And sure enough, for the Computer Virus Catalog, artist Jonathan Zawada has given us an intriguing look at what kryptonite on crack looks like, with the digital lichen seemingly taking inspiration from the green-hued screens of old ’80s monitors.

Looking over the Catalog, it feels like something has almost been lost. Because when they weren’t actually infecting your machine, the viruses of the past could be wonderful, replacing all of the files on your computer with pictures of squids or simulating an LSD hallucination. Compared to the malware of yesteryear, the computer virus has sold out.

Article source: http://www.fastcodesign.com/3033139/infographic-of-the-day/visualized-the-weirdest-wildest-viruses-in-computer-history

Deb Socia helps the disadvantaged learn essential computer skills

Anyone looking for a job these days knows that the search is nearly all done online, from finding openings to submitting an application and résumé. Student research projects and scholarship applications have moved online, too.

But what if your only access to a computer or the Internet is for a half-hour at a school or public library? What if you don’t even have an e-mail account?

Those without Internet access (often people who are very poor) are finding it increasingly difficult to undertake essential everyday tasks like these.

Recommended: STEM Heroines: Math role models for girls

An estimated 60 million people in the United States live without access to a home computer or the Internet, according to a study by the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project. And an estimated 40 million people have access only to a smart phone, which is not the easiest way to fill out a job application or research and write a school paper.

Enter Deb Socia, a lifelong educator and former principal who has become a technology champion for the very poor, those with disabilities, seniors, and immigrants. Her goal is to help them gain access to and understand how to use the Internet – two things that most people take for granted.

Ms. Socia is the driving force behind Tech Goes Home, a program administered by OpenAirBoston, a nonprofit group that helps give Boston residents the tools, training, and access needed to successfully go online.

Tech Goes Home connects Boston residents who make $20,000 a year or less and who may have never sent an e-mail before with schools, community programs, and government agencies. Socia and her small team also raise funds and find volunteers to help these residents learn how to send e-mails, search for housing and jobs, and create and send digital résumés.

These are critical skills in a world where some 80 percent of Fortune 500 companies – including huge employers such as Wal-Mart and Target – only accept online applications.

The program also includes 15 hours of hands-on classroom training and a new small, inexpensive laptop or other mobile device (available for a $50 co-payment). For those who are eligible, the program provides access to low-cost home Internet service, too.

Participants leave the program changed: Retirees are able to see their grandchildren via a Skype video call for the first time, parents who have been out of work for years find jobs, and members of communities become better connected with each other.

Carl Baty asked to be included in the program when he worked at a halfway house helping with some of the toughest cases. Socia and her crew sprang into action, and soon Mr. Baty and four of the nine men living in the house were taking the free class.

Each man saw major shifts in his life, Baty says.

Baty had wanted to start his own business helping people recovering from addiction get back on their feet. “I was two years out of a 47-year addiction and nobody, nobody wanted to talk to me about anything,” he says.

But Tech Goes Home did. Baty took the small-business class and learned how to create a Facebook page that helped his business, called Rounding the Bases, get on its feet. “Every time I post something on Facebook,” Baty says, “Deb is always, always the first one to see it and post something. How does she do that?” Her involvement still touches him.

Socia, who is just 4 feet, 11 inches tall and comes from a large Portuguese-American family in New Bedford, Mass., is not known for sitting still for long. She has raised two boys with special needs, reads about five books a week, sits on two nonprofit boards, travels to Washington to petition lawmakers, volunteers regularly at a senior center (where she serves a proper English tea), is passionate about fairness in education – and expects results.

“We don’t let logistics get in the way around here,” says her colleague, Dan Noyes, who shares an office with Socia, with a playful smile.

“There is a solution for every problem,” Socia says matter-of-factly. “The question is, What does it look like?”

Take, for example, the way Socia became involved with Tech Goes Home. About a decade ago she took on the job of principal at a new school in Dorchester, an economically challenged Boston neighborhood. The budget constraints were so severe that she was not permitted to hire any staff until July, even though the doors of the school were to open in September.

When the school year got under way, it was clear that some students were at a serious disadvantage.

“If you have two children who are both in AP [advanced placement] history, both equally talented, equally motivated, and equally interested,” she explains, “and this child has access [to the Internet] at home and this child doesn’t, and they get an assignment today to do some research, how can you possibly … judge them the same way?”

And that, Socia says, was why she got involved. “The inherent unfairness … is really what pushed me to want to focus on this work,” she says.

Despite the naysaying of skeptics and the challenge of jumping through bureaucratic hoops, she was determined that her students would all have their own computers. Socia and her team at the Lilla G. Frederick Pilot Middle School reached out to Tech Goes Home, which at the time was helping supply students in low-income areas with refurbished desktop computers, while also teaching rudimentary computer skills to adults.

Socia saw the potential in Tech Goes Home, and began fundraising to revamp the program to better suit her school’s needs. The effort included finding funds to turn her school into the first urban middle school in the state to ensure that every student had a computer and understood how to use it.

Her students’ grades went up. To the surprise of some observers, no students lost their computers. On top of that, more than 85 percent of the students who completed the 15-hour program began regularly using their computer to do homework, Socia says.

“But the greatest thing as an educator,” she says, “was the increase in first-time parent participation at school.”  

The involvement of parents can greatly help a child’s performance in school, Socia says. Before the program started training parents and children in how to use computers, she says, about 200 parents would attend her school’s open houses. After the program started, she began to see 1,000 or more parents showing up.

Almost 70 percent of the parents who enrolled in the program had never before participated in any school activities with their children. For 80 percent of the participating Spanish-speaking parents it was the first time they had attended a school event.

Socia was so successful that the city of Boston asked her to revamp the entire Tech Goes Home program. She helped write a federal grant application and, after seven years as school principal, left to join Tech Goes Home as executive director.

The year before she took over, Tech Goes Home had helped train some 600 residents (a third of them from her school). In the four years since, she and her team – two full-time staff members and one AmeriCorps volunteer – have transformed and broadened the program: Today, more than 10,000 families have benefited from it.

Socia has also helped expand Tech Goes Home partnerships beyond schools and families to other community institutions, such as libraries, community centers, and housing associations. At these the program reaches new immigrants, disabled people, and seniors.

“We changed the program entirely so that it became about ‘how do you help someone improve their quality of life?’ ” Socia says.

“How do we help people find resources that support them? How do we help them learn something new that could help their job prospects? How do we help them save money? How do we help them find culturally relevant, fun activities?”

Socia remains the driving force behind Tech Goes Home, Mr. Noyes says.

“She’s never letting us settle for the status quo, even if the status quo is good,” he says. “It’s like, ‘Well, let’s make it a bit better – but also be realistic.’ ”

• To learn more about Tech Goes Home, visit http://www.techgoeshome.org.

HOW TO TAKE ACTION

Universal Giving helps people give to and volunteer for top-performing charitable organizations around the world. Projects are vetted by Universal Giving; 100 percent of each donation goes directly to the listed cause. Below are groups selected by Universal Giving that provide job skills training or other aid to help lift people out of poverty worldwide:

• Rural Communities Empowerment Center provides resources and services to achieve high levels of literacy in rural Ghana. Take action: Help a girl become computer literate.

• Nepal Youth Foundation brings hope to destitute children in Nepal by providing education, housing, medical care, and support. Take action: Rescue girls from bonded servitude.

• Give A Day Global offers volunteer opportunities that help underprivileged women through education, microfinance loans, and more. Take action: Help women with microfinance loans in Kenya.

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Article source: http://news.yahoo.com/deb-socia-helps-disadvantaged-learn-essential-computer-skills-124003176.html